Timber Rattlesnake (Crotalus horridus) – Black morph & Chris Jenkins

I have dedicated my career to conserving the species many people have overlooked, reptiles and amphibians, and these amazing animals need you to join the effort too. In many ways it is the best and worst of times for the reptiles and amphibians of the world. We are at an all-time high in terms of awareness—every day there are more television shows, internet articles and nature programs about these animals. I experience more and more children showing a deep fascination to learn more about snakes; more state and federal agencies are focused on managing and conserving rare turtles; and more nonprofit organizations are working to protect habitats for amphibians.

But there are also many challenges ahead. Turtles are the most endangered groups of animals on the planet. Widespread waves of disease are causing the extinction of many amphibians. The majority of venomous snakes that are unlucky enough to encounter humans are killed. Habitat loss, fragmentation and degradation continues around the world. Thus, despite the advances that have been made, reptiles and amphibians face an uncertain future. But you can help us improve the future of these imperiled animals by joining the Orianne Society in our mission and conservation efforts.

The Orianne Society is dedicated to conserving reptiles and amphibians around the world. Our approach, “Science Fueled, Boots on the Ground Conservation,” is focused on using science to implement sound conservation actions such as land protection, restoration and management and rare species reintroductions. We have three pillars to our approach: research, conservation and education. We are not working alone on this mission, we partner with hundreds of other nonprofits, agencies, universities, and private citizens. Working in partnership is one of the keys that will help us reach the goal of ensuring a future for reptiles and amphibians or the often forgotten species of conservation.

I am proud to say we have built a strong network including the finest staff of scientists and conservation biologists and university, agency, nonprofit and citizen partners. We are working hard to build this network, and we need you to join us, as well. The more partners Orianne can bring together, the greater chance we have of turning the tide and achieving conservation success for the world’s reptiles and amphibians and the habitats they need to survive.

Sincerely,

Christopher L. Jenkins, PhD

Chief Executive Officer, The Orianne Society